measles cases up to 39 across metro detroit area

image105

38 cases reported in Oakland County, one in Wayne County: Vaccinations urged!

LANSING (CCN) — The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) has confirmed five additional measles cases of measles this week, bringing the state total to 39 so far this year. The newly confirmed cases were all in Oakland County, bringing the case count to 38 there to go with one case in Wayne County. Infected individuals range in age from 8 months to 63 years old.


MDHHS is working closely with the Oakland County Health Division to identify possible exposure locations for these latest cases. Known exposure sites in Oakland County are listed at www.Oakgov.com/health. Additional sites of potential exposures will be identified and listed as more information is learned. There are no public exposure sites for the Wayne County case.


In response to the latest confirmed cases, Oakland County Health Department officials are hosting a special measles vaccination clinic open to the public Saturday (April 6) from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. at the South Oakland Health Center, which is located at 27725 Greenfield Road in Southfield. No other vaccines will be available at the clinic. 


The Indiana State Department of Health has also confirmed a case of measles unrelated to the Michigan outbreak in its state with exposure locations in the Michigan community of Sturgis, Anyone who visited these locations March 31 may have been exposed and are urged to watch for signs of measles:


  • Holy Angels Catholic Church at 402 S. Nottawa Street in Sturgis
  • San Miguel Grocery at 211 Jacob Street in Sturgis
  • Walmart Supercenter at 1500 S. Centerville Road in Sturgis.


MDHHS officials stress that the measles vaccine is highly effective and very safe. A single dose of measles vaccine protects about 95 percent of children, but after two doses, almost 100 percent are immune. The first of two routine childhood measles vaccine doses is given at 12-15 months of age. A second vaccine dose is given before the start of kindergarten, between ages 4 and 6 years. MDHHS follows Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance and does not recommend routine measles vaccinations for children less than 12 months of age unless there is a suspected measles exposure; there is thought to be an imminent measles exposure such as being in areas of known measles; or international travel planned.For international travel, infants as young as 6 months should be vaccinated against measles. Measles vaccine, or other acceptable documentation of immunity to measles, is recommended for all persons travelling internationally.You cannot get measles from the vaccine. It is effective when given within 72 hours of exposure to prevent illness. In addition, immune globulin (Ig) treatment is effective within six days of exposure for high-risk individuals. Talk to your healthcare provider to determine if immune globulin is right for you.High-risk individuals include those who are un-vaccinated or unsure about vaccination status, pregnant women and those who are immune-compromised (have a weakened immune system due to illness and diseases like HIV, malnutrition and/or medications).This is the highest number of measles in the state since 1991 when 65 cases were reported. So far this year, there have been 387 cases of measles confirmed in 15 states. Measles is a highly contagious, vaccine-preventable disease that is spread by direct person-to-person contact, and through the air. The virus can live for up to two hours in the air where the infected person was present. 


Symptoms of measles usually begin 7-14 days after exposure, but can appear up to 21 days after exposure and may include as follows:


  • High fever (may spike to over 104˚F).
  • Cough.
  • Runny nose.
  • Red, watery eyes (conjunctivitis).
  • Tiny white spots on the inner cheeks, gums, and roof of the mouth (Koplik Spots) 2-3 days after symptoms begin.
  • A rash that is red, raised, blotchy; usually starts on face, spreads to trunk, arms, and legs 3-5 days after symptoms begin.
  • If symptoms develop, residents are urged to call their doctor or emergency room before arriving so they can take precautions to prevent exposure to other individuals.

For more information about measles, visit CDC.gov/measles. For more information about Michigan’s current measles outbreak, visit Michigan.gov/MeaslesOutbreak

Attorney General Dana Nessel praises 6th Circuit Court of Appeals decision to keep Inkster murderer in prison

 LANSING (CCN) — Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel delivered a Thursday (April 4) press release to explain her fight to revoke the release on bond of convicted murderer George Clark of Inkster.


The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals granted an emergency motion filed last month by AG Nessel to revoke the release of Clark on bond. Clark was convicted of first-degree murder in 2003 for killing Michael Martin in Inkster. Clark challenged his conviction on appeal, through briefing and motions in the state courts, and at the federal level. All failed.

In 2015, Clark produced an affidavit from a woman named Kaneka Jackson which said that Jackson had seen the real killer and that it was not Clark. Jackson said she told her father, an Inkster police detective who has since passed away, what she had seen. Because Jackson’s father was a police officer, he had a duty to turn over any evidence that might show Clark to be innocent. But in her affidavit, Jackson says her father told her to keep quiet for her own safety.


A federal district judge relied on Jackson’s affidavit to issue an order in July 2018 saying that Clark’s rights were violated because information had been withheld and granted Clark a new trial.


The Michigan Department of Attorney General appealed the judge’s decision to the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit under former AG Bill Schuette's leadership, arguing in part that the affidavit was not trustworthy and certainly not enough to set Clark free without a hearing. 


That appeal is pending before the court.


In the meantime, Clark asked the district court to release him from prison on bond during the appeal of his case. AG Nessel opposed this request in part based on evidence provided by the Wayne County Prosecuting Attorney’s Conviction Integrity Unit that cast serious doubt on the veracity of Jackson’s affidavit. The Conviction Integrity Unit found that there may have been a romantic relationship between Clark and Jackson, that Clark told Jackson that he would pay her money from a lawsuit he would file under Michigan’s Wrongful Imprisonment Compensation Act, and that it was highly improbable that Jackson could have seen the killer from where she said she was at the time. The district court nonetheless ordered Clark be immediately released from prison pending the appeal.


The Attorney General filed an emergency motion in the Sixth Circuit to revoke Clark’s release. In response, the 6th Circuit has now issued an order that revoked Clark’s bond. Clark returned to prison on March 25 where he will now remain pending a decision.


The Wayne County Prosecuting Attorney’s Conviction Integrity Unit was instrumental in independently investigating the case to determine if Clark could in fact be innocent. AG Nessel said she greatly appreciates the skillful work of the Conviction Integrity Unit led by Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Valerie Newman and created by Wayne County Prosecuting Attorney Kym Worthy that led to this dangerous prisoner being returned to prison. 


101 recruits graduate from 135th Trooper Recruit School to become Michigan State Police Troopers

 LANSING (CCN) — A 28-week training school is over for 101 recruits who graduated on Wednesday (April 3) from the 135th Trooper Recruit School to officially become Michigan State Police Troopers.


Governor Gretchen Whitmer delivered the keynote speech at the commencement ceremony, saying, " I’m proud to recognize the graduates of the 135th Trooper Recruit School who are joining the ranks of the Michigan State Police today. There is no greater calling than service to others and it is my honor to support you as you commit yourselves to a career of public service right here in our great state of Michigan. I wish each of you a long, safe and rewarding career with the Michigan State Police.”


In his address to the graduates, MSP Director Col. Joe Gasper said, “As you leave here today, I encourage you to seek to be what I call the ‘quiet professional.’ Listen first and show kindness, treating everyone with dignity and respect.” The 28-week training school gave the recruits training in firearms, water safety, defensive tactics, patrol techniques, report writing, ethics, cultural diversity and implicit bias, first aid, criminal law, crime scene processing and precision driving.


As part of the department’s commitment to community outreach and service, the recruits organized a holiday toy drive in partnership with the Marine Corps Reserve “Toys for Tots” and raised $8,400 for Guardian Angels Medical Service Dogs. The class also helped to prepare a meal for the Commission on Aging’s “Meals on Wheels” program.



 Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services approves Michigan’s demonstration waiver for substance use disorder treatment services 


 LANSING (CCN) — The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services announced on Friday (April 5) that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has approved Michigan’s application for a new Medicaid 1115 Demonstration Waiver for Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Services. This project is expected to improve health outcomes for Medicaid beneficiaries by increasing access to high quality opioid use disorder/SUD care and expand the provider networks available to serve Michigan residents.


This demonstration will allow Michigan to broaden residential substance use disorder services in the state’s existing network of SUD providers. Additionally, the demonstration provides the state the ability to use Medicaid funding to pay for services in residential and withdrawal management treatment facilities that would otherwise be excluded from federal reimbursement.  “The opioid crisis has affected nearly all Michiganders in some way, and I am pleased that Michigan is going to be able to expand services for individuals seeking help with substance use disorders,” said Robert Gordon, MDHHS director. “Demonstration projects like this help develop new best practices that can be scaled here and across the country as we all work to address this critical public health emergency.”


The state and CMS expect that offering a full continuum of SUD treatment and recovery supports based on American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) and SUD-specific program standards will result in improved health outcomes and sustained recovery.


Michigan will begin to provide SUD services through this demonstration starting Oct. 1, 2019. 


State Board of Education narrows list of candidates for Michigan's next State Superintendent

LANSING (CCN) — Members of the State Board of Education announced in a Friday press release that they have narrowed the list of applicants for the next State Superintendent to five candidates.


“It was a difficult decision to narrow it down to five because we had so many highly-qualified candidates. It was a really tough choice,” said State Board of Education President Casandra E. Ulbrich. “They have varying degrees of backgrounds. We’re going to have a really diverse group of people with very different backgrounds.”


After reviewing all 51 applicants with its hired executive search firm, Ray & Associates, the State Board agreed to bring in the following candidates on April 22 and April 24 for public interviews. 


  • Jeanice Swift, Superintendent, Ann Arbor Public Schools
  • Michael Rice, Superintendent, Kalamazoo Public Schools
  • Randy Liepa, Superintendent, Wayne RESA
  • G. Eric Thomas, Chief Turnaround Officer, Georgia Board of Education
  • Brenda Cassellius, Immediate Past Minnesota Commissioner of Education


At the April 24 meeting, the State Board will select those who will become finalists. Those finalists will come in for a public interview on May 7, after which the State Board is expected to select Michigan’s next State Superintendent. In addition to preliminary discussions with State Board members on what skills and attributes they’d like to see in the next State Superintendent, Ray & Associates conducted conversations with education stakeholders and top policymakers in Michigan, as well as background checks of the applicants. “We wanted to make sure we had a lot of different perspectives,” Ulbrich said. “This has been a very open, transparent, and inclusive process.” Fridays discussion was held in closed sessions to respect those applicants who requested confidentiality in the initial phase of the process.


Applications for the top job came in from 11 states.


The State Board of Education is granted the responsibility to appoint a State Superintendent by the Michigan Constitution. The State Superintendent is the principal executive officer of the Michigan Department of Education and is chairperson of the State Board without the right to vote and shall be responsible for implementing its policies, and has all the powers and duties provided by law. The State Superintendent is responsible for the day-to-day management, supervision, and leadership of the Michigan Department of Education. The Superintendent is responsible for developing cooperative working relationships with other government departments; the Governor’s office; the state legislature; and constituent groups, in service of SBE policy and the Michigan’s Top 10 in 10 strategic plan for improving education.


This top education position became open last spring upon the death of State Superintendent Brian Whiston. Chief Deputy Superintendent Sheila Alles was appointed Interim State Superintendent by the State Board at that time.

x

  LANSING (CCN) —  

x

  LANSING (CCN) —  

x

 LANSING (CCN) — 

Grand Blanc Twp. chiropractor charged with two counts of criminal sexual conduct against patient

GRAND BLANC TWP. (CCN) — A long-time Grand Blanc Township chiropractor  was charged Friday with two counts of criminal sexual conduct related to accusations by one of his female patients. Genesee County Prosecutor David Leyton's office filed charges Friday, according to a press release from Chief Deputy Assistant Prosecutor John Potbury.


Two counts of fourth degree criminal sexual conduct were filed against Charles Jackson Jr., of Davison. The 61-year-old Jackson has operated from an office on Hill Road in Grand Blanc Township for many years.


Potbury said that based on evidence from an investigation by the Grand Blanc Township Police Department, Jackson was charged after accusations that he inappropriately made physical contact with a female patient while the patient was receiving a chiropractic examination. The victim alleges that Jackson inappropriately massaged her and groped her during two separate appointments. between December of last year and February of this year.


Jackson is expected to be arraigned Friday in Genesee County 67th District Court. Each count carries a penalty of up to two years in prison, if convicted. Fourth degree criminal sexual conduct is defined as sexual contact with someone  at least 13 years old but under age 16 years with the accused being at least five years older than the victim.



State Police to focus on impaired drivers during St. Patrick's Day 'Operation C.A.R.E."

GRAND BLANC TWP. (CCN) — A long-time Grand Blanc Township chiropractor  was charged Friday with two counts of criminal sexual conduct related to accusations by one of his female patients. Genesee County Prosecutor David Leyton's office filed charges Friday, according to a press release from Chief Deputy Assistant Prosecutor John Potbury.


Two counts of fourth degree criminal sexual conduct were filed against Charles Jackson Jr., of Davison. The 61-year-old Jackson has operated from an office on Hill Road in Grand Blanc Township for many years.


Potbury said that based on evidence from an investigation by the Grand Blanc Township Police Department, Jackson was charged after accusations that he inappropriately made physical contact with a female patient while the patient was receiving a chiropractic examination. The victim alleges that Jackson inappropriately massaged her and groped her during two separate appointments. between December of last year and February of this year.


Jackson is expected to be arraigned Friday in Genesee County 67th District Court. Each count carries a penalty of up to two years in prison, if convicted. Fourth degree criminal sexual conduct is defined as sexual contact with someone  at least 13 years old but under age 16 years with the accused being at least five years older than the victim.



Attorney General Dana Nessel pulls Michigan out of federal lawsuit to reduce number of protected bodies

LANSING (CCN) — Newly-elected Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel withdrew the state from an environmental case seeking to reduce the number of bodies of water protected under the federal Clean Water Act. Wednesday's action marked the sixth federal environmental case that the state has withdrawn from since Nessel took office on January 1.


The lawsuit, originally filed by AG Nessel’s predecessor, is an effort to block a joint EPA and Army Corps of Engineers rule which clarifies which bodies of water fall under federal oversight. The 2015 rule is in effect for 22 states, including Michigan.


“As Michiganders, we have a responsibility to be good stewards of the Great Lakes and all our waterways and wetlands,” AG Nessel said. “While Michigan has protective regulations in place, this lawsuit sought to weaken the federal law which establishes minimum nationwide standards for protecting our shared water resources, including the Great Lakes. This was a compelling reason for us to withdraw. Michigan won’t be party to a lawsuit that could jeopardize the nation’s largest freshwater shoreline and all waters we’re entrusted to protect and we certainly won’t stand a watered-down policy.”

Embattled ex Macomb County clerk in trouble again; This time it's embezzlement, domestic violence

WARREN (CCN) — The former Macomb County clerk is in trouble again. The Warren Police Department arrested Karen Spranger on embezzlement and domestic violence charges on Thursday, according to a Detroit Free Press story posted on its online edition.

Spranger was removed as Macomb County's clerk in March of last year when court proceedings determined she had lied about her residency when filing to run for office in 2016.

Spranger was arrested, according to the Free Press, on charges of assaulting a 78-year-old Warren woman and stealing from her. Warren Police Commissioner Bill Dwyer told the Free Press that a warrant had been requested from the office of Macomb County Prosecutor Eric Smith for embezzlement of a vulnerable adult, $1,000 to $20,000 and domestic violence. The embezzlement count is a felony that could bring five years in prison, if convicted. The domestic violence charge would have Spranger facing up to 93 days in county jail on a misdemeanor.

32-year-old with drunken driving conviction arraigned in fatal pedestrian crash in Shelby Twp.

SHELBY TWP. (CCN) — A 32-year-old man with a prior conviction for drunken driving was charged Thursday in the crash that killed a 15-year-old child as he walked on a Shelby Township street last month. 


Albert Donadio was arraigned in a Macomb County District court on one count of operating a vehicle under the influence of drugs causing death and one count of reckless driving causing death. Both are felonies punishable by up to 15 years in prison, if convicted. Donadio was also charged with a moving violation causing death, a misdemeanor. Bond was set at $20,000 and a judge ordered Donadio to wear a blood-alcohol-monitoring tether and to undergo drug testing at least four times a month. He is scheduled to appear in court for a preliminary exam on March 12.


Authorities said he  hit the child at about 6:10 pm on Jan. 5 on 25 Mile Road, west of Hayes Road.


Macomb County officials again eyeing new jail facility: Price tag to be at least $370 million

MOUNT CLEMENS  (CCN) — Some Macomb County are again talking about building a new jail in the City of Mount Clemens, according to a story published by the Detroit Free Press in its online edition.


The renewed push to build a new nine-story facility on property next to the current jail comes nearly two years after a study recommended a new facility or major renovations. The Free Press put the proposed price tag to be recommended by Macomb County Sheriff's Department officials at between $370 million and $390 million for a new facility to be built. 


The measure would need a millage or bond request to be approved by voters, according to a proposal presented for the first time Thursday to the Macomb County Board of Commissioners. The proposal given to commissioners would leave enough space for another tower to be added at a future date, if needed, to add at least 300 more beds for potential inmates.


Western Michigan's hockey coach digging into his own pocket to buy tickets for students at big home series

 KALAMAZOO (CCN) — Andy Murray is a former NHL coach who has spent eight seasons behind the bench at Western Michigan. The Broncos went to the NCAA tournament during his debut year but have been back only once since, and the veteran coach is hoping to motivate the students on the Kalamazoo campus to pack Lawson Arena this weekend as they aim to get back to the NCAA's big dance this year by winning the National Collegiate Hockey Conference tournament.


An automatic bid goes to the tourney champion.

Murray is so confident a full house can help motivate his players that he announced he's digging into his own pocket to help the cause. Any students who buy a ticket for Friday's game can show their ticket stubs at the door Saturday night to get in free. Murray is covering the cost out of his own pocket.  READ MORE

Chief Financial Officer Hughey Newsome tells Flint City Council he's leaving because of 'politics'

FLINT (CCN) — The Harvard graduate hired to become the City of Flint's Chief Financial Officer is leaving. Hughey Newsome's departure became public Monday night during a Flint City Council meeting.


   Newsome's resignation letter complained that he was tired of political attacks. Newsome also made a brief statement during a heated exchange between city council members Monday as they feuded over allegations that a letter was illegally written by three elected officials to Governor Gretchen Whitmer and Attorney General Dana Nessel.


   City Councilman Eric Mays presented a copy of the letter to The Morning Gazette Radio Show and said three signatures on it was in violation of the Flint City Charter and subjects them to criminal penalties under the state's Open Meetings Act. Councilwoman Kate Fields said the letter was legal because she didn't meet privately with co-authors Allan Griggs and Eva Worthing. Griggs confirmed in public Monday that no meeting took place before signing the letter. READ MORE

New AG moves to drop charges against four defendants in marijuana cases pending in her office

 LANSING  (CCN) — Citing weak cases and changing laws, newly-elected Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel announced in a press release that her office will move this week to dismiss all the charges against four defendants in two of the three marijuana cases pending in her office’s Criminal Division. 


AG Nessel said plea offers will be made to reduce charges to most of the remaining defendants in all three cases. “We are focusing all of our efforts and resources on the truly bad actors and those who have non-marijuana related charges,” AG Nessel said. “They will be held accountable and we will pursue them. Juries don’t want to convict people on charges concerning something that is now legal. The dismissals against some of the defendants in these cases also reflect that they either were not major players in these marijuana cases or that the evidence is simply insufficient to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that they committed the charged crimes.”


Cases will be dismissed, according to the press release, in two St. Clair County Circuit Court felony cases while reduced plea deals will be offered in additional felony cases filed in Genesee County Circuit Court and Livingston County Circuit Court.


 

Burton City Councilman Duane Haskins throws hat into ring for mayor's race as first to turn in petitions

 BURTON  (CCN) — The Morning Gazette Radio Show reported Thursday that Burton's mayoral race has its first official name on the ballot. Long-time City Councilman Duane Haskins turned in petitions Wednesday to run against incumbent Paula Zelenko and said he plans to make an official announcement in mid-April at a campaign fund raiser event.


The long-time vice president of the city council has been elected to multiple terms since winning as a first-time candidate in 2007. Haskins owned a t-shirt printing business with his wife in Burton for many years and is employed as a deputy with the Genesee County Sheriff's Department. Haskins has also served multiple terms as president of the Genesee County Sheriffs Deputies Association which has more than 240 union members under his leadership.


"I love Burton and I want to help the city," said Haskins in announcing his mayoral bid. He revealed that he will retire from his job as a sheriff's deputy if he wins.

Councilman Eric Mays files lawsuit to ask circuit court judge to remove 6 members of Flint City Council!

FLINT (CCN) — Six members of the Flint City Council could be removed from office if one of their colleagues gets his way. City Councilman Eric Mays, who was the top vote getter among all nine winners in Flint's 2017 ward races, filed a lawsuit in Genesee County Circuit Court Wednesday to argue that six of his peers violated the new Flint City Charter adopted by voters in 2017.


Mays told The Morning Gazette Radio Show that he may hire an attorney to help him try to remove his colleagues. He says the removal can be done under the new charter adopted to replace the old one that was originally passed by voters in 1974. "I want to point out, too, that the new charter has some serious problems that we may need to take a look at because I don't think it should be this easy to remove people out of their (council) seats," Councilman Mays said.


He says 4th Ward Councilwoman Kate Fields, 8th Ward Councilman Allan Griggs, 9th Ward Councilwoman Eva Worthing, 3rd Wart Councilman Santino Guerra, 7th Ward Councilwoman Moncia Galloway and Council President Herb WInfrey from the 6th Ward should be removed for violations of the new charter. The only council members not targeted by Mays were 2nd Ward Councilman Maurice Davis and 5th Ward Councilman Jerri Winfrey-Carter.  READ MORE

Burton City Councilman Duane Haskins throws hat into ring for mayor's race as first to turn in petitions

 BURTON  (CCN) — The Morning Gazette Radio Show reported Thursday that Burton's mayoral race has its first official name on the ballot. Long-time City Councilman Duane Haskins turned in petitions Wednesday to run against incumbent Paula Zelenko and said he plans to make an official announcement in mid-April at a campaign fund raiser event.


The long-time vice president of the city council has been elected to multiple terms since winning as a first-time candidate in 2007. Haskins owned a t-shirt printing business with his wife in Burton for many years and is employed as a deputy with the Genesee County Sheriff's Department. Haskins has also served multiple terms as president of the Genesee County Sheriffs Deputies Association which has more than 240 union members under his leadership.


"I love Burton and I want to help the city," said Haskins in announcing his mayoral bid. He revealed that he will retire from his job as a sheriff's deputy if he wins.



CLICK HERE TO READ MORE STATE NEWS STORIES